Contents

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Volume 8, Issue 2, 2011

National Editorial Board and Editorial Committee


EDITORIAL

Shouldn’t ‘Normal’ Schools be More Normal?
JOHN O’NEILL AND PAUL ADAMS

New Zealand’s first Normal schools were established in Otago (1876), Canterbury (1877), Wellington (1880) and Auckland (1881). They provided an environment for both the education and practice of trainee teachers (Harte, 1972). In those days it was a relatively modest enterprise. Today, Aotearoa New Zealand is markedly different ...

 

EARLY CHILDHOOD AND COMPULSORY EDUCATION

Transition to School: A Principles Approach
ANITA MORTLOCK, NATALIE PLOWMAN AND ALI GLASGOW

With the onset of National Standards, early childhood teachers may feel increasing pressure to adopt formal literacy and numeracy instruction methods in order to prepare children for school. In terms of children’s preparation for school, adults need to think beyond the acquisition of academic skills. It is argued that the four principles of the early childhood curriculum provide an effective framework for teachers in schools and early childhood centres to use in assisting children and their families to move from early childhood education to school ...

The Effects of Intensification on Rural Teachers’ Work
GLORIA PENRICE

This article reports on a study exploring in-school intensification experiences identified by six experienced rural teachers as constraining their teaching practice. School organisational structures, school cultures, personal relationships within the school context, along with high self-imposed expectations can result in an increased workload and demands on teachers’ time. This study examined the differing responses these teachers employed in an attempt to counteract or minimise the effects of intensification ...

Empowering Students as Active Participants in Curriculum Design and Implementation
JOHN JAGERSMA AND JIM PARSONS

Curriculum is constructed with the learner as its central focus. Yet the voice of the learner is largely excluded from the curriculum design and implementation process. The intent of this paper is to seek a deeper understanding of the potential for increased learning when students are included in curriculum design ...

Meat in the Sandwich: The Impact of Changing Policy Contexts and Local Management of Schools on Principals’ Work in New Zealand 1989-2009
NOELINE ALCORN

The impact of principal leadership on school outcomes, particularly student achievement, is assuming unprecedented attention internationally. Official discourses often assume that principals can be trained to achieve prescribed outcomes through the employment of learned strategies. Such claims are challenged by critical leadership scholars who insist on the significance of context. This paper explores the impact of policy contexts on the work of a small group of experienced principals in New Zealand over a period of 20 years ...

Philosophy for Children (P4C): A New Zealand School-based Action Research Case Study
LEON BENADE

This paper considers whether Philosophy for Children (P4C) can contribute to the development of the ‘thinking’ key competency of The New Zealand Curriculum. Additionally, it seeks to demonstrate what ‘action research’ looks like in relation to a seven month trial in a New Zealand school of P4C and its associated methodology of the Community of Philosophical Enquiry (COPE) ...

The Place of History in The New Zealand Curriculum
ROWENA TAYLOR AND MARK SHEEHAN

The implementation of The New Zealand Curriculum has major implications for teaching and learning history both in junior secondary school social studies and in senior history courses. It requires a shift in orientation for both subject communities. It is argued that the way to bridge the different orientations of both subject communities is for historical thinking that reflects the key concepts of the discipline of history to be central to both social studies and history programmes so that students are intellectually equipped to make authentic connections between the past and the present ...

Maori Medium Teachers: Getting the Professional Development they Need
MERI MARSHALL AND TABITHA McKENZIE

In 2007, the Ministry of Education commissioned an evaluation of three Maori medium junior reading series. Questionnaires were completed by 84 teachers in Level 1, 81- 100% immersion Maori settings, and semi-structured focus group interviews were undertaken with 15 teachers and 14 literacy experts. Two case studies and a review of texts were also undertaken. This article explores an emerging theme from the evaluation data around professional development (PD) ...

‘Seeing-as’ in the School Context
SILWA CLAESSON

‘Seeing-as’ in the school context is suggested as complementary to the customary planning of teaching in advance. Seeing-as has to do with a lived agreement between teacher and pupils. It can simply frame an activity or be very specific. Teachers can use seeing-as in their own way in today’s classrooms where teaching seems more than ever to do with sensitivity, interaction and a willingness to play ...

Helping Children Hear: Teachers’ Experiences of Using Soundfield Amplification Systems
PAULINE DICKINSON AND LANUOLA ASIASIGA

The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the quality and success of the implementation of Soundfield Amplification Systems (SAS) in primary schools in Hawke’s Bay, where audiometry failure rates at school entry are generally higher than overall national rates and are particularly high for Maori and Pacific children who are at greater risk for otitis media ...

 

TERTIARY EDUCATION

Unlearning and Relearning: Chinese Students in a New Zealand First Year Undergraduate Class
XIAOYAN GUAN AND GLYNDWR JONES

For almost two decades New Zealand’s tertiary institutions experienced growth in international student enrolments with Chinese students making up the largest proportion of the numbers. Many of these students experience ‘culture shock’ both inside and outside of the classroom. To succeed they need to ‘unlearn’ previous ways of studying and adjust to the new academic requirements. This study reports the experience of Chinese undergraduates in a first year management paper as they encountered different styles of lecturing, group work, tutorials and an emphasis on application rather than textbook based study ...

The Teacher/ Researcher and the Role of Pre-understanding: A Personal Analysis
THOMAS G. RYAN

The acknowledgement of pre-understanding is imperative within research and/or teaching. Pre-understanding consists of both explicit and tacit knowledge that can best be understood as two levels or planes; namely, first- hand and second-hand pre-understanding ...

 

PEER REVIEWERS FOR 2006-2011

Peer Reviewers for the 2006-2011 Issues of the New Zealand Journal of Teachers’ Work

The editors are very grateful to the following colleagues who have reviewed and provided expert opinions on manuscripts submitted to NZJTW for peer review. The quality of our peer review processes is reflected in the fact that NZJTW satisfied the criteria for inclusion as a Tier C ‘quality, peer reviewed, journal’ in the 2010 Australian Ranking of Journals ...

 

 

 

 


 

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